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23 March 2017

CONFERENCE: "Quelques considérations sur certains choix systématiques concernant l’enrichissement sans cause" (Paris, March 27 2017)


WHAT Quelques considérations sur certains choix systématiques concernant l’enrichissement sans cause, conference

WHEN March 27, 2017, 17:30

WHERE Paris, Université Paris Descartes, Law faculty, Salle des Actes, 10, Avenue Pierre Larousse, Paris

speaker

Prof. Vincenzo Mannino, Roma Tre University

16 March 2017

JOURNAL: Journal of Legal History XXXVIII (2017), No. 1

(image source: Uni Glasgow)

Routledge announced the publication of the first issue for 2017 of the Journal of Legal History.

Articles:
"Article Carlen v Drury (1812): The Origins of the Internal Management Debate in Corporate Law" (Victoria Barnes & James Oldham)

"Defending the Accused: The Impact of Legal Representation on Criminal Trial Outcomes in Victoria, Australia 1861–1961"
(Alana Piper & Mark Finnane)

"‘Female Husbands’, Community and Courts in the Eighteenth Century"
(Caroline Derry)

"Scottish Legal History Group Report 2016"

"Migrations of Manuscripts 2016"
(John Baker)

Book review
"Rehabilitation and Probation in England and Wales, 1876-1962" (Conor Hanly)

More information on the Routledge website.

JOURNAL: Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international XIX (2017), No. 1

(image source: Brill)

Brill announced the publication of the first issue of the 2017 volume of the Journal of the History of International Law.

Articles:
"The Forgotten Genocide in Colonial America: Reexamining the 1622 Jamestown Massacre within the Framework of the UN Genocide Convention" (John T. Bennett)
"Imperial Colonialism in the Genesis of International Law – Anomaly or Time of Transition?" (Paulina Starski & Jörn Axel Kämmerer)
"Piracy and Empire: The Campaign against Piracy, the Development of International Law and the British Imperial Mission" (Michael Mulligan)
"Beyond the Myth of a Non-relationship: International Law and World War I" (Oliver Diggelmann)

Book reviews:
"Imperial Justice: Africans in Empire’s Court , written by Bonny Ibhawoh" (Evelyn Mogere)
"Formalizing Displacement: International Law and Population Transfers , written by Umut Özsu" (Alain Zamaria)

More information on Brill's website.

JOURNAL: American Journal of Legal History LVII (2017), No. 1

(image source: OUP)

Oxford University Press announced the publication of a new issue of the American Journal of Legal History (vol. LVII, Issue 1).

Articles:

  • "Franklin Redivivus: The Radical Constitution, 1791-1799" (Adam Lebovitz)
  • "The Making of European Law: Exploring the Life and Work of Michel Gaudet" (Anne Boerger, Morten Rasmussen)
  • "In a Summary Way, with Expedition and at a Small Expence": Justices of the Peace and Small Debt Litigation in Late Colonial New York" (Sung Yup Kim)
Book Reviews:
  • "Wendell Bird, Press and Speech Under Assault: The Early Supreme Court Justices, the Sedition Acts of 1798, and the Campaign Against Dissent" (Terri D. Halperin)
  • Laura E. Free, Suffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era (Ann D. Gordon (Emerita))
  • Susanna L. Blumenthal. Law and the Modern Mind: Consciousness and Responsibility in American Legal Culture (Guyora Binder)
More information on the OUP website.

CONFERENCE: Société Internationale Fernand De Visscher pour l'Histoire des Droits de l'Antiquité (Bologna/Ravenna, 12-16 Sep 2017)

(image source: Wikimedia Commons)

The SIDHA has announced that its 71st session wil take place in the beautiful cities Bologna and Ravenna, from 12 to 16 September 2017.

More details on the conference website.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED: European Forum of Young Legal Historians (Naples); 31 MAR 2017

(image source: AYLH)

The Call for Paper for the European Forum of Young Legal Historians in Naples has been extended to 31 March 2017.

More information on the AYLH's website.

(Source: Grama László)

14 March 2017

BOOK: C.H. ALEXANDROWICZ (ed. David ARMITAGE & Jennifer PITTS), The Law of Nations in Global History. Oxford: OUP, 2017, 464 p. ISBN 9780198766070, £ 80

(image source: OUP)

Oxford University Press publishes an edition of the work of C.H. Alexandrowicz, edited by David Armitage and Jennifer Pitts (The Law of Nations in Global History).

Book summary: 
The history and theory of international law have been transformed in recent years by post-colonial and post-imperial critiques of the universalistic claims of Western international law. The origins of those critiques lie in the often overlooked work of the remarkable Polish-British lawyer-historian C. H. Alexandrowicz (1902-75). This volume collects Alexandrowicz's shorter historical writings, on subjects from the law of nations in pre-colonial India to the New International Economic Order of the 1970s, and presents them as a challenging portrait of early modern and modern world history seen through the lens of the law of nations. The book includes the first complete bibliography of Alexandrowicz's writings and the first biographical and critical introduction to his life and works. It reveals the formative influence of his Polish roots and early work on canon law for his later scholarship undertaken in Madras (1951-61) and Sydney (1961-67) and the development of his thought regarding sovereignty, statehood, self-determination, and legal personality, among many other topics still of urgent interest to international lawyers, political theorists, and global historians.

Table of contents:
1: 'This Modern Grotius': An Introduction to the Life and Thought of C.H. Alexandrowicz, David Armitage and Jennifer Pitts
PART ONE: THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE LAW OF NATIONS
2: Kautilyan Principles and the Law of Nations (1965-66)
3: Paulus Vladimiri and the Development of the Doctrine of the Coexistence of Christian and Non-Christian Countries (1963)
4: Mogul Sovereignty and the Law of Nations (1955)
PART TWO: ASIA AND THE LAW OF NATIONS
5: 'Jus Gentium' and the Law of Nature in Asia (1956)
6: Some Problems in the History of the Law of Nations in Asia (1963)
7: Le Droit des Nations aux Indes Orientales: Aux XVIe, XVIIe, XVIIIe siècles (1964)
8: Grotius and India (1954)
9: Freitas Versus Grotius (1959)
10: The Discriminatory Clause in South Asian Treaties in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (1957)
11: A Persian-Dutch Treaty in the Seventeenth Century (1958)
12: Puffendorf-Crull and the Afro-Asian World (1968-69)
13: A Treatise by J. H. G. Justi on Asian Government (1960-61)
14: Doctrinal Aspects of the Universality of the Law of Nations (1961)
15: G. F. de Martens on Asian Treaty Practice (1964)
16: The Continuity of the Sovereign Status of China in International Law (1956)
17: The Legal Position of Tibet (1954)
18: Is India a Federation? (1954)
PART THREE: AFRICA AND THE LAW OF NATIONS
19: Le Rôle des Traités dans les Relations entre les Puissances Européennes et les Souverains Africains (Aspects historiques) (1970)
20: The Partition of Africa by Treaty (1974)
21: The Role of Treaties in the European-African Confrontation in the Nineteenth Century (1975)
22: The Role of German Treaty Making in the Partition of Africa (1980)
23: The Juridical Expression of the Sacred Trust of Civilization (1971)
PART FOUR: THE RECOGNITION OF NEW STATES IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
24: Empirical and Doctrinal Positivism in International Law (1974-75)
25: The Theory of Recognition in Fieri (1958)
26: The Quasi-Judicial Function in the Recognition of States and Governments (1952)
27: Israel in Fieri (1951)
28: New and Original States: The Issue of Reversion to Sovereignty (1969)
29: The New States and International Law (1974)
30: The Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States (1975)
Bibliography of the Writings of C. H. Alexandrowicz
On the author and the editors:
Charles Henry Alexandrowicz (1902-1975) was a Polish scholar who pioneered research in the critical history of international law in the 1950s and 1960s. His works included World Economic Agencies, Law and Practice (1962); An Introduction to the History of the Law of Nations in the East Indies (1967); The Law of Global Communications (1971); and The Law-Making Functions of the Specialised Agencies of the United Nations (1973).
David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, where he teaches intellectual and international history. He is also an Affiliated Faculty member at Harvard Law School and an Affiliated Professor in Harvard's Department of Government. Among his publications are The Ideological Origins of the British Empire (2000), The Declaration of Independence: A Global History (2007), Foundations of Modern International Thought (2013), The History Manifesto (co-auth., 2014), and Civil Wars: A History in Ideas (2017).
Jennifer Pitts is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. She is author of A Turn to Empire: the rise of imperial liberalism in Britain and France (2005) and editor and translator of Alexis de Tocqueville: writings on empire and slavery (2001). She is currently completing a book,Boundaries of the International, that explores European debates over legal relations with extra-European societies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 
More information with OUP.

10 March 2017

CONFERENCE: Training, ideas and practice. The Law of Nations in the Long Eighteenth Century (Paris, 18/19 May 2017)

COLLOQUE JUNIOR CIERA - Training, Ideas and Practice
The Law of Nations in the Long Eighteenth Century



Day 1: 18 May 2017 (Maison de la Recherche/CIERA)

12:45
Welcoming

13:20
Keynote lecture by Luigi Nuzzo (Università del Salento)

14:00
Session 1: Training (president: Luigi Nuzzo - Università del Salento)

Zülâl Muslu (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre), Language and Power: the Spread of European Diplomatic Cuture in the Ottoman Empire through the Ecole de jeunes de langues 

Dante Fedele (KULeuven), La formation diplomatique dans la littérature sur l’ambassadeur et l’art de négocier (fin XVIIe-début XVIIIe siècle)  

Annika Haß (Université de la Sarre/EPHE), Librairie internationale et diplomatie (1789-1830)  

Raphael Cahen (VUB/FWO), Hauterive et l’École des diplomates

17:10-17:20
Coffee Break

17:20-18 :50  Session 2 : Circulation of Ideas and Diplomatic Networks (president: Christine Lebeau) 
Benjamin Durst (Universität Augsburg), Gedruckte Vertragssammlungen als Medien des Völkerrechts in Theorie und Praxis  

Stephan F. Mai (Universität Wien), Diplomatic Immunity between Theory and Practice: Abraham de Wicquefort (1606-1682) as a Case Study 

19:30  Conference dinner (presenters only)  

Day 2: 19 May 2017 (Fondation Biermans-Lapôtre/CIUP)

08:00-08:30
Welcome and coffee


08:30-10:00 Session 2 (part 2): Circulation of Ideas and Diplomatic Networks (president: Christine Lebeau, Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)  Frederik Dhondt (VUB/UAntwerpen/UGent-FWO), A Pragmatic Utopian ? Saint-Pierre’s vision on Perpetual Peace and its Practical Legal Background in Regency Diplomacy  
Alice 
Bairoch de Sainte-Marie (Université de Genève), La conception des devoirs du négociateur en Nouvelle-France: heritage métropolitain ou cas particulier ? 


10 :00-10 :10
  Coffee Break 

10 :10-13 :20
  Session 3 : Transformation of the Law of Nations (president: Miloš Vec, Universität Wien/IWM)  Patrick Milton (Freie Universität Berlin), The Guarantee of the Peace of Westphalia in the Law of Nations and its Impact on European Diplomacy  
Elisabetta Fiocchi Malaspina (Universität 
Zürich): Trans-forming the Law of Nations in Diplomacy: the Case of the 18th Century Italian Peninsula  
Omer 
Duran (Istanbul University): The Legal Status of the ‘Memleketeyn’ (Wallachia and Molodvia) according to the Ottoman-Islamic Law of Nations  Victor Simon (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne): La dignité impériale des rois de France en Orient: titulatures et traductions dans la diplomatie franco-ottomane

13:20-14:30
Lunch

14:30-15:15  Final debate - Conclusion
(
Miloš Vec-Universität Wien/IWM)


Organising Committee

Raphael Cahen (Orléans/VUB-FWO)
Frederik Dhondt (VUB/UAntwerpen/UGent-FWO)
Elisabetta Fiocchi Malaspina (Zürich)

Scientific Committee
Jacques Bouineau (Université de La Rochelle)
Paul De Hert (VUB)
Dirk Heirbaut (UGent)
Christine Lebeau (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Gabriella Silvestrini (Università del Piemonte Orientale)
Matthias Schmoeckel (Universität Bonn)
Antonio Trampus (Università di Venezia)
Miloš Vec (Universität Wien/IWM)

Venue  Day 1: Maison de la Recherche (28, Rue Serpente ; 75006 PARIS)  Day 2 : Fondation Biermans-Lapôtre (9A, Boulevard Jourdan ; 75014 PARIS) 



08 March 2017

CONFERENCE & CFP: "Territorial Governance and State Representatives in the Long 19th Century. Circulation of Knowledge, Models and Men" (Brussels, December 7-8 2017)





WHAT Territorial Governance and State Representatives in the Long 19th Century. Circulation of Knowledge, Models and Men, Conference and Call for papers

WHEN December 7-8, 2017

WHERE Open Universiteit, Campus Vrije Universiteit Brussels

Throughout Europe, the 19th century saw the growth and modernisation of many levels of administration. The state-building process frequently led to the introduction or consolidation of sub-national, or territorial, representatives of the government such as governors and prefects. Many types of representatives of the state have existed in Europe, and many still do. Long, historical research into territorial administration and state representatives was nationally-orientated and disregarded the cultural dimension. As a result, European territorial administration and state officials are scarcely explored from a historical-comparative or cross-cultural viewpoint.

Recently, instigated by Pierre Karila-Cohen (Rennes 2/Institut Universitaire de France), an international group of researchers, inspired by developments in various disciplines, has taken up the challenge of filling this historiographical gap. Colloquiums were held in 2015 and 2016, in Rennes (see http://www.sites.univ-rennes2.fr/cerhio/spip.php?article1699 and https://www.univ-rennes2.fr/cerhio/actualites/colloque-international-civils-militaires-dans-administration-territoriale). The objective of this 3th colloquium, to be held in Brussels, is to further the understanding of territorial officials and administration from a transnational point-of-view.

Within the humanities, the past decades have seen the development of transnational approaches to problematize the nation-state as a unit of analysis. A striking paradox in the history of state-building is that nation-states frequently were shaped using foreign examples. Even though states underscored the national character of their institutions, reforms actually emerged from transnational communication. Both in the social sciences and humanities, the notion of ‘circulation’ has taken root to examine contemporary travelling concepts on good (public) governance, and the intermediaries that transgressed national borders, thus facilitating the exchange of ideas. Drawing on these strands in research, this colloquium proposes to investigate territorial governance and state representatives through the prism of ‘circulation’.

BOOK: "Granville Sharp's Cases on Slavery" by Andrew Lyall (March, 2017)





Andrew Lyall, Granville Sharp's Cases on Slavery

all information here

The purpose of Granville Sharpe's Cases on Slavery is twofold: first, to publish previously unpublished legal materials principally in three important cases in the 18th century on the issue of slavery in England, and specifically the status of black people who were slaves in the American colonies or the West Indies and who were taken to England by their masters. The unpublished materials are mostly verbatim transcripts made by shorthand writers commissioned by Granville Sharp, one of the first Englishmen to take up the cause of the abolition of the slave trade and slavery itself. Other related unpublished material is also made available for the first time, including an opinion of an attorney general and some minor cases from the library of York Minster.
The second purpose, outlined in the Introduction, is to give a social and legal background to the cases and an analysis of the position in England of black servants/slaves brought to England and the legal effects of the cases, taking into account the new information provided by the transcripts. There was a conflict in legal authorities as to whether black servants remained slaves, or became free on arrival in England. 


Lord Mansfield, the chief justice of the court of King's Bench, was a central figure in all the cases and clearly struggled to come to terms with slavery. The material provides a basis for tracing the evolution of his thought on the subject. On the one hand, the huge profits from slave production in the West Indies flooded into England, slave owners had penetrated the leading institutions in England and the pro-slavery lobby was influential. On the other hand, English law had over time established rights and liberties which in the 18th century were seen by many as national characteristics. That tradition was bolstered by the ideas of the Enlightenment. 


By about the 1760s it had become clear that there was no property in the person, and by the 1770s that such servants could not be sent abroad without their consent, but whether they owed an obligation of perpetual service remained unresolved. - See more at: http://www.bloomsburyprofessional.com/uk/granville-sharps-cases-on-slavery-9781509911219/#sthash.AY2eqVh2.dpuf 

Dr Andrew Lyall is a retired member of staff in Law at University College Dublin


Table of contents